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[Reference and Non-Fiction Books]
Reference and Non-Fiction Books.

[1,000 Collectibles: Memorabilia and Stories from a Galaxy Far, Far Away]

Paperback Book
Check availability & pricing at:

[amazon.com]

[amazon.co.uk]


1,000 Collectibles: Memorabilia and Stories from a Galaxy Far, Far Away
Stephen J. Sansweet with Anne Neumann
Abrams [US / UK]
Published as:
Paperback Book (2009)

Rating:
If you have read this book, please rate it:
Reviews:
1 review

Book Description:
Star Wars: 1,000 Collectibles takes the reader on a journey through cool and kitsch, from toys and costumes to life-size statues made of LEGO bricks to consumer goods such as candy, clothing, toothpaste and much more. Drawn from the largest private Star Wars collection in the known universe, this stunning treasure trove of memorabilia and colourful anecdotes mixes fun with nostalgia, delighting both the casual fan and the serious collector. Since the first Star Wars film opened in 1977, George Lucas's epic space fantasy has become not only one of the most successful entertainment franchises of all time, but also an obsession for collectors around the globe, who have spent more than $15 billion on Star Wars merchandise.
These collectibles range from the offbeat: C-3PO tape dispensers, fan-made bantha pinatas, and Darth Vader popcorn poppers; to the everyday: Boba Fett cake pans, Yoda PEZ dispensers, and "Cream of Jawa" soup. Here for the first time is a chronicle of the constantly expanding, all-encompassing, often-surreal lifestyle of collecting Star Wars, filled with incredible stranger-than-fiction stories from the galaxy's foremost collector.


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Other books by this author:


Book Reviews:

Review by Ewan, Star Wars Books, 2009:
"A quick flick through this book is reminiscent of glancing through a copy of a good quality Star Wars collector's guide. However, 1,000 Collectibles is more than your usual collector's guide with its pictures and price evaluations as, even though none of the items in this book contain evaluations, this book captures both those commercial and non-commercial pieces of Star Wars memorabilia that stand apart from your normal collector's collection. These pieces have been collected over a thirty year period and belong to a collection containing over 75,000 items and include almost everything produced that has a Star Wars label or can be identified as belonging to Star Wars. It's just as well that Sansweet and Neumann only selected 1,000 items from this collection as this paperback book weighs just over three-and-a-half pounds - a book of this quality cataloguing the whole collection would require a forklift to carry it. All of the 1,000 selected items are accompanied by high quality photographs and most have a personalised comment from the authors that explain a little of the item's background and, on occasion, how it came to be in their collection, hence the book's subtitle: Memorabilia And Stories From A Galaxy Far, Far Away.
"The selected 1,000 pieces have been split into 6 chapters that catalogue the six main groups of memorabilia. The first chapter, Play With It, deals with toys. A rather obvious place to start as toys from the Original Trilogy period, particularly Kenner's action figures, became the first Star Wars collectible items. But it doesn't focus exclusively on Kenner's figures, although Sansweet does provide a concise history of these figures, instead the reader is taken on a voyage around the world (and this is the same for the other five chapters) as Sansweet and Neumann compare how different territories marketed similar and different pieces of memorabilia. So, we have action figures, jigsaws, games and other toys from the US, Britain, France, Germany, Japan and elsewhere from 1977 right up to 2008. They have selected not just the obvious but also the wonderfully different, like the marvellous wind-up clockwork tin toys from Japan or the delightful Ewok plush toys from Spain.
"This is followed by Wear It, a chapter dedicated to clothing and apparel: from the t-shirts of 1977 and the Underoos of the 1980s to the Darth Vader Hoodie of 2008. There are belt buckles, costumes, flip-flips, gloves, helmets, jackets, pin-badges, masks, sneakers, slippers, ties, watches, even pet clothing - all with the Star Wars name attached to it or sewn into it. Next comes the amusingly titled Eat It Or Keep It, which looks at licensed food products. Fans of a certain age will readily recall Star Wars breakfast cereals, particularly Kellogg's C-3P0's from the mid-1980s, even Star Wars Popsicles, while younger fans may be more familiar with the burger chains and fizzy drinks tie-in promotions for the Prequel Films. However this book also includes milk cartons from the US, Coca-Cola & Fanta bottle tops from Mexico and Japan, microwaveable curries from Japan, Red Bull cans from Thailand and fromage frais pots and pasta shapes in tomato sauce tins from the UK. It beggars belief if some of these items may still contain their original contents - at least the contents of the milk cartons appear to have been disposed of and, hopefully, the cartons cleaned.
"The fourth chapter, Look At It, looks at those pieces that are meant to be displayed and admired. Items like the extremely rare bronze statues of Yoda and Darth Vader or the R2-D2 and C-3P0 Fan Film Awards, but Sansweet and Neumann do not forget the trading cards (including the infamous x-rated C-3P0 card from 1977), or the Bobble Head figures, or the replica lightsabers, or the maquette statues and the posters that are more accessible to the average fan. Chapter five is, rather aptly, titled Use It. It examines those everyday items and objects that we use all the time, the only difference is that these items have Star Wars stamped on them. So we have everything from umbrellas and golf bags in Japan, cookie jars and skateboards in the US, lunch boxes and snow boards in Canada, schoolbags in Germany, toothpaste in Spain, bubble bath in the UK and perfume in France.
"The last chapter, Can You Believe It, focuses on the unusual and bizarre items that have been licensed by Lucas, like the UHU glue stick with Ewok figure from Italy, or the Australian Return of the Jedi stickers found in bags of dog food, or the Episode III sick bags used by Virgin Atlantic.
"Throughout the book some of the nicest pieces of memorabilia are the fan-made items, like the AT-AT wooden figure from 1980/81 that a father hand-made for their kid. It is also nice to see recognition in this book for those unofficial products, what some refer to as 'bootleg', but are mainly unlicensed and therefore illegal products, such as the UK thimbles or the Japanese resin model kit of a scantily clad female stormtrooper made in an unknown backyard garage.
"1,000 Collectibles is not your usual read-it-cover-to-cover book, rather it is one of those pick-up-and-read books that you will return to again and again. Some of the more amusing items of memorabilia make great talking points between Star Wars fans and non-Star Wars fans alike and as such 1,000 Collectibles is a book that should be on every coffee table."


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